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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Adenosarcoma of the uterus


Other Names for this Disease

  • Mullerian adenosarcoma of the uterus
  • Uterine adenosarcoma
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

What is adenosarcoma of the uterus?

What causes adenosarcoma of the uterus?

Is adenosarcoma of the uterus inherited?

What is adenosarcoma of the uterus?

Adenosarcoma of the uterus is a rare tumor of the uterus that typically originates in the lining of the uterus (endometrium).[1] This type of tumor is characterized by both benign (noncancerous) and malignant components (low-grade sarcoma).[1][2] Typical symptoms in affected individuals may include abnormal vaginal bleeding, an enlarged uterus, and tissue protruding from the external os (external opening of the uterus that leads into the cavity of the cervix).[1][3] It is most common in post-menopausal women but can affect women of any age.[3] Factors that may predisposed an individual to the condition include hyperestrogenemia (high blood estrogen levels), chemotherapy, or radiotherapy.[3] Recommended treatment includes hysterectomy, usually accompanied by bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (removal of fallopian tubes and ovaries).[1] Ovarian conservation is an option for reproductive age women.[1]
Last updated: 10/12/2012

What causes adenosarcoma of the uterus?

The exact cause of adenosarcoma of the uterus is not always known. The development of these tumors has been associated with a few risk factors. Risk factors are associated with an increased risk of developing a condition; however, most people with these risk factors will never develop the condition. Factors that have reportedly been associated with development of adenosarcoma of the uterus include hyperestrinism (abnormally high levels of estrogenic hormones in the body), prior chemotherapy, prior radiotherapy and tamoxifen therapy (used as an adjuvant drug for breast cancer).[3][4][5]
Last updated: 10/12/2012

Is adenosarcoma of the uterus inherited?

To our knowledge, there have not been reports of familial cases of adenosarcoma of the uterus, nor have there been reports of a particular gene being linked to this specific type of tumor. Some types of uterine cancer and/or endometrial cancer are known to be associated with hereditary cancer syndromes, but we are unaware of information about an association between these cancer syndromes and uterine adenosarcoma specifically.

Individuals who are interested in learning about how their personal or family history of cancer may affect other family members should speak with an oncologist or genetics professional. These health care providers can help determine whether genetic testing for an inherited susceptibility to cancer is appropriate and/or available.
Last updated: 10/12/2012

References
  1. Xie YP, Yao HX, Shen YM. Müllerian adenosarcoma of the uterus with heterologous elements: two case reports and literature review. Arch Gynecol Obstet. August 2012; 286(2):537-540.
  2. Volkan Ulkera, Ekrem Yavuzb, Ali Gedikbasic, Ceyhun Numanoglua, Sinem Sudolmusc, Ahmet Gulkilika. Uterine adenosarcoma with ovarian sex cord-like differentiation: A case report and review of the literature. Taiwanese Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. December 2011; 50(4):518–521.
  3. Sinha A, Phukan JP, Sengupta S, Guha P. Mullerian adenosarcoma of uterus with sarcomatous overgrowth and heterologous component associated with stromal deposit in omentum: a case report and review of the literature. Case Report Med. 2012; ePub:
  4. Tjalma WA, Michener CM. Mullerian adenosarcoma of the uterus associated with long-term oral contraceptive use. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. April 1, 2005; 119(2):253-254..
  5. Arici DS, Aker H, Yildiz E, Tasyurt A. Mullerian adenosarcoma of the uterus associated with tamoxifen therapy. Arch Gynecol Obstet. September 2000; 264(2):105-107.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Mullerian adenosarcoma of the uterus
  • Uterine adenosarcoma
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.