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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Brenner tumor of ovary


Other Names for this Disease
  • Ovarian Brenner tumor
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Your Question

Can you provide me with information about Brenner tumors of the ovary? Are these tumors benign? Can they be cured?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

What is a Brenner tumor of the ovary?

A Brenner tumor of the ovary is a small, firm, smooth and solid growth (tumor) on the ovary.  Brenner tumors of the ovary usually do not cause symptoms.[1][2][3]  Approximately 2% of all ovarian tumors are Brenner tumors.  There are three forms of this tumor: benign, proliferative (low chance of spreading beyond the original location of the tumor), and malignant.[1][2]  The current preferred term for benign Brenner tumors of the ovary is transitional cell tumors.[2]  These tumors usually occur in women ages 40 to 60 years.[2]  Treatment usually consists of surgery to remove the tumor.[2][3]  If a Brenner tumor has not spread into surrounding tissues or to more distant parts of the body, there is a good-to-excellent prognosis.[1]
Last updated: 1/11/2012

What are the signs and symptoms of a Brenner tumor of the ovary?

Most Brenner tumors do not cause any symptoms.  If a Brenner tumor is quite large, it may cause pain or discomfort in one side of the abdomen.  Postmenopausal bleeding (showing signs of a menstrual period after menopause) is sometimes associated with Brenner tumors, as endometrial hyperplasia also occurs in 10% to 16% of cases of Brenner tumors.[2]
Last updated: 1/11/2012

Are Brenner tumors of the ovary benign?

Most Brenner tumors of the ovary are benign and do not spread into surrounding tissues.[1]  Approximately 1-2% of these tumors can become malignant and may spread into surrounding tissues or to more distant parts of the body.[2]
Last updated: 1/11/2012

How is a Brenner tumor of the ovary diagnosed?

Approximately 90% of Brenner tumors of the ovary are discovered by chance during a gynecologic operation.[2] They often occur at the same time as other ovarian tumors or cancers.[1][3]  Most benign Brenner tumors make a protein called p63.  Because other ovarian tumors and malignant Brenner tumors do not make this protein, p63 is considered a tumor marker for Brenner tumors of the ovary.  Therefore, if p63 is identified in a patient, this may help to diagnose a Brenner tumor of the ovary.[3]
Last updated: 1/11/2012

What treatments might be available for Brenner tumors of the ovary?

Treatment of Brenner tumors of the ovary usually consists of surgery to remove the tumor.[2][3]  The age of the patient may be a factor in deciding the extent of the operation.[2]
Last updated: 1/11/2012

What is the prognosis for individuals with Brenner tumors of the ovary?

If a Brenner tumor of the ovary has not spread beyond the ovary, individuals with these tumors are likely to do very well and have a good-to-excellent prognosis.[1]  In most cases, surgery to remove a Brenner tumor is considered a cure for this condition.[3]
Last updated: 1/11/2012

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