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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Hypotrichosis simplex


Other Names for this Disease

  • Hereditary hypotrichosis simplex
  • HHS
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

My daughter has hypotrichosis simplex. Is there hope for her to grow hair on her scalp in the future?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

What is hypotrichosis simplex?

Hypotrichosis simplex is a rare form of hereditary hair loss without other abnormalities. Affected individuals typically show normal hair at birth, but experience hair loss and thinning of the hair shaft that starts during early childhood and progresses with age. Hypotrichosis simplex can be divided into 2 forms: the scalp-limited form and the generalized form, in which all body hair is affected. The progressive thinning of the hair shaft is a typical feature of androgenetic alopecia. Hypotrichosis simplex can be inherited either as an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive trait. Some cases are caused by mutations in the APCDD1 gene on chromosome 18p11.[1] To date, there is no treatment for this condition.[2]
Last updated: 7/12/2011

Is there treatment for hypotrichosis simplex? Is there hope for hair growth in the future?

Individuals with hypotrichosis simplex experience a gradual loss of scalp hair that begins during the middle of the first decade and results in almost complete loss of hair by the third decade. A few sparse, fine, short hairs may remain in some individuals.[3] There is currently no treatment for hypotrichosis simplex.[2]
Last updated: 7/12/2011

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • Hereditary hypotrichosis simplex
  • HHS
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.