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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis


Other Names for this Disease

  • ADE
  • ADEM
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Symptoms

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What are the signs and symptoms of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM)?

The symptoms of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) come on quickly, beginning with encephalitis-like symptoms such as fever, fatigue, headache, nausea and vomiting, and in severe cases, seizures and coma.  It may also damage white matter (brain tissue that takes its name from the white color of myelin), leading to neurological symptoms such as visual loss (due to inflammation of the optic nerve) in one or both eyes, weakness even to the point of paralysis, and difficulty coordinating voluntary muscle movements (such as those used in walking).  ADEM is sometimes misdiagnosed as a severe first attack of multiple sclerosis (MS), since some of the symptoms of the two disorders, particularly those caused by white matter injury, may be similar.  However, ADEM usually has symptoms of encephalitis (such as fever or coma), as well as symptoms of myelin damage (visual loss, paralysis), as opposed to MS, which doesn’t have encephalitis symptoms.  In addition, ADEM usually consists of a single episode or attack, while MS features many attacks over the course of time.[1]
Last updated: 7/27/2011

References
  1. NINDS Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis Information Page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders (NINDS). November 2010; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/acute_encephalomyelitis/acute_encephalomyelitis.htm. Accessed 7/27/2011.


Other Names for this Disease
  • ADE
  • ADEM
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.