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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Feingold syndrome


Other Names for this Disease
  • Brunner-Winter syndrome
  • Digital anomalies with short palpebral fissures and atresia of esophagus, or duodenum
  • Microcephaly-oculo-digito-esophageal-duodenal syndrome
  • MMT syndrome
  • Oculodigitoesophagoduodenal syndrome
More Names
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Your Question

My son was recently diagnosed with Feingold. I was told by his doctor that this syndrome was very rare. So I started doing research online and came across a web page about who had discovered it and when. It said since 2003 only 79 people world wide have been diagnosed with it. My question is do you know how many people have been diagnosed with it now?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

How many people have Feingold syndrome?

Because there is no official method for tracking rare conditions like Feingold syndrome, the actual number of people with this syndrome is not known. However a general sense of the rarity can sometimes be achieved by searching the medical literature for case reports and articles. Case reports provide information on individual or groups of cases. However, not every person who is diagnosed with a rare condition will have an article regarding their diagnosis published. Also, some people with rare conditions are never diagnosed.

You may find Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and PubMed.gov to be helpful resources as you seek to stay abreast of new reports of Feingold syndrome. OMIM is an online catalog of genetic disorders. Each entry summarizes the information that has been published in medical journals. Click here to view the OMIM page on Feingold syndrome. Likewise PubMed.gov is a searchable database of medical literature. Click here to view journal articles that discuss Feingold syndrome.

Last updated: 5/16/2013