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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Swyer-James syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • Swyer-James-MacLeod syndrome
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Overview

Swyer-James syndrome is a rare condition in which the lung (or portion of the lung) does not grow normally and is slightly smaller than the opposite lung, usually following bronchiolitis in childhood. It is typically diagnosed after a chest X-ray or CT scan which shows unilateral pulmonary hyperlucency (one lung appearing less dense) and diminished pulmonary arteries.[1][2] Affected individuals may not have any symptoms, or more commonly, they may have recurrent pulmonary infections and common respiratory symptoms.[2] The cause of the condition is not completely understood.
Last updated: 10/21/2011

References

  1. Beverly P Wood. Swyer-James Syndrome Imaging . eMedicine. May 25, 2011; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/361906-overview#a19. Accessed 10/19/2011.
  2. Bai Chong, Song Xiao-lian, Shi Hui, Yao Xiao-Peng and Li Qiang. Swyer-James Syndrome with Peculiar Course and Ipsilateral Pulmonary Vein Defect. Internal Medicine. 2011; 50:1829-1833.
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In Depth Information

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  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Swyer-James syndrome. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.

Selected Full-Text Journal Articles

Other Names for this Disease
  • Swyer-James-MacLeod syndrome
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.