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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Neurofibromatosis type 1


Other Names for this Disease

  • NF1
  • Recklinghausen's disease
  • Type 1 neurofibromatosis
  • Von Recklinghausen disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

I am under alot of stress and have noticed more and more new tumors, and the older ones have increase in size, and some of them have changed color. Will stress increase the growth of tumors?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

Can stress worsen symptoms of neurofibromatosis type 1?

Stress is a known risk factor for a variety of ill-health effects, including certain heart and autoimmune conditions. Unfortunately little is known regarding its effect on the signs and symptoms of NF. Studies have investigated the rate of psychological conditions (such as anxiety and depression) among people with NF1. In these studies, the people with psychological conditions did not tend to have more severe disease that those without them.[1] However, we could not find information regarding the health effects of acute (sudden/severe) stressful life events in people with NF1. We encourage you to discuss this question further with your healthcare provider.
Last updated: 10/18/2013

References
  • Wolkenstein P, Zeller J, Revuz J, Ecosse E, Leplège A. Visibility of neurofibromatosis 1 and psychiatric morbidity. Arch Dermatol. 2003;139:103–104; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12533184. Accessed 10/18/2013.
Other Names for this Disease
  • NF1
  • Recklinghausen's disease
  • Type 1 neurofibromatosis
  • Von Recklinghausen disease
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.