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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Progressive supranuclear palsy


Other Names for this Disease

  • Familial progressive supranuclear palsy (type)
  • PSP
  • Steele-Richardson-Olszewski Syndrome
  • Supranuclear palsy, progressive
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Cause

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What causes progressive supranuclear palsy?

The signs and symptoms of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) appear to be related to abnormalities in tau proteins, which are important for the function of neurons. The defective tau proteins in affected people form clumps within neurons and other brain cells. Affected cells in brain structures responsible for coordinating movement gradually die, causing the movement abnormalities and other features of PSP.[1]

In most cases, the underlying cause of PSP remains unknown. In a few cases, PSP has been associated with mutations in the MAPT gene. Researchers suspect that other genetic and environmental factors also contribute to PSP, but these factors have not yet been identified.[1]
Last updated: 8/28/2014

References
  1. Progressive supranuclear palsy. Genetics Home Reference. March 2011; http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/progressive-supranuclear-palsy. Accessed 9/7/2012.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Familial progressive supranuclear palsy (type)
  • PSP
  • Steele-Richardson-Olszewski Syndrome
  • Supranuclear palsy, progressive
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.