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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Poland syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • Poland anomaly
  • Poland sequence
  • Poland syndactyly
  • Poland's syndrome
  • Unilateral defect of pectoralis muscle and syndactyly of the hand
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Your Question

I have Poland syndrome. I have a support group here in the U.S. and I also belong to one in the UK. Are there any numbers to report on just how many people in the U.S. have Poland syndrome?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

How many people have Poland syndrome?

Poland syndrome is thought to be under-reported and under-diagnosed, making the exact incidence of the condition difficult to determine. Some men remain undiagnosed unless they seek treatment for associated hand abnormalities when present; other individuals may not realize they have features of the condition until puberty.[1] It has been estimated that the incidence of the condition is about 1 in 30,000.[1][2] However, it has also been reported that the incidence ranges from 1 in 7,000 to 1 in 100,000, depending on the severity of the condition and the patient population.[2]

A current search of the available literature does not yield reliable statistics specific to the incidence or prevalence of Poland syndrome in the United States. If the estimated incidence of 1 in 30,000 were applied to the U.S. population size, over 10,000 people in the U.S. would have Poland syndrome. However, to our knowledge, data confirming these statistics in the U.S. are not currently available.
Last updated: 9/10/2012

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • Poland anomaly
  • Poland sequence
  • Poland syndactyly
  • Poland's syndrome
  • Unilateral defect of pectoralis muscle and syndactyly of the hand
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.