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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Ovarian remnant syndrome


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Your Question

I can not find any help in regards to this disease.  Since I was diagnosed with this I have been left to deal with it myself and its getting to the point of no return.  So any help in getting me pointed in the right direction would be helpful.

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

How can I find help treating my ovarian remnant syndrome?

Ovarian remnant syndrome occurs when ovarian tissue is left behind following surgery to remove both ovaries (bilateral oophorectomy). Common signs and symptoms include a mass and regular pelvic pain. Ovarian remnant syndrome can cause blockages of the urinary tract (ureteral obstruction).[1][2][3] Ureteral obstruction may cause serious, even life-threatening symptoms. You can familiarize yourself with the signs and symptoms of urinary tract blockage by visiting the MayoClinic.com Web site at the following link:
http://www.mayoclinic.org/ureteral-obstruction

Treatment of ovarian remnant syndrome may involve surgery to remove the remnant ovarian tissue. Because the ovarian remnant can be very difficult to distinguish from surrounding tissues, surgery should be performed by highly experienced surgeons. When surgery is not an option, treatment may be aimed at preventing blockages of the urinary tract.[3]  There have been individual case reports describing the use of leuprolide acetate therapy for treatment of ovarian remnant syndrome.[3] Ovarian remnant syndrome may recur following treatment.[1][3]

It can be difficult to find healthcare professionals who are experienced in treating an uncommon condition like ovarian remnant syndrome. If you have not already done so, we suggest beginning by talking with your healthcare provider regarding an appropriate referral. For additional tips, we invite you to visit the following link on Finding An Expert. 
http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/FindAnExpert.aspx

In addition, professional societies like the following provide physician finder tools which may be helpful in locating local specialists.

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologist
Find an OBGYN: http://www.acog.org/About_ACOG/Find_an_Ob-Gyn

The Society of Gynecologic surgeons
Find an SGS Physician: http://www.sgsonline.org/findsgsphys.php

Last updated: 12/12/2012

References
  • Valea FA, Mann WJ. Oophorectomy and ovarian cystectomy. In: Basow, DS. UpToDate. Waltham, MA: UpToDate; 2012;
  • Benign Gynecologic Lesions: Ovarian Remnant Syndrome. In: Lentz. Comprehensive Gynecology, 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Mosby; 2012;
  • Pathophysiology of Urinary Tract Obstruction: Ovarian Remnants. In: Wein. Campbell-Walsh Urology, 10th. ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders; 2011;
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.