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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Moyamoya disease


Other Names for this Disease

  • Moyamoya disease 1
  • Moyamoya disease 2
  • Moyamoya disease 3
  • Moyamoya disease, primary
  • Moyamoya disease, secondary
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Treatment

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How might Moyamoya disease be treated?

Treatment for Moyamoya disease should begin early in the disease course to prevent severe complications.[1] Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, and is the only viable long-term treatment.[2] There are several types of revascularization surgeries that can restore blood flow to the brain by opening narrowed blood vessels, or by bypassing blocked arteries. While children usually respond better to revascularization surgery than adults, the majority of individuals have no further strokes or related problems after surgery.[3]

No medication can stop the narrowing of the brain's blood vessels, or the development of the thin, fragile vessels that characterize the disease.[2] However, medications are used to treat many of the symptoms of the disease, and are often an important part of the management. Medications may include aspirin (to prevent or reduce the development of small blood clots); calcium channel blockers (which may improve symptoms of headaches and reduce symptoms related to transient ischemic attacks); and anti-seizure medications (when needed for a seizure disorder). In a few cases, anticoagulants may be needed for unstable people with frequent symptoms. However, they are not used long-term due to the risk of cerebral bleeding.[4]

Additional information about the treatment of Moyamoya disease is available on Medscape Reference's Web site.

People interested in learning about specific treatment options for themselves or family members should speak with their health care provider.
Last updated: 7/1/2014

References
  1. Josette Mancini. Moyamoya Disease. Orphanet. September, 2006; http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?lng=EN&Expert=2573. Accessed 7/2/2014.
  2. Edward Smith. Moyamoya Disease. Boston Children's Hospital. 2011; http://www.childrenshospital.org/health-topics/conditions/m/moyamoya-disease. Accessed 7/2/2014.
  3. Moyamoya Disease Information Page. NINDS. April 16, 2014; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/moyamoya/moyamoya.htm. Accessed 7/1/2014.
  4. Moyamoya syndrome. NORD. January 20, 2012; http://www.rarediseases.org/rare-disease-information/rare-diseases/byID/617/viewAbstract. Accessed 7/2/2014.


Management Guidelines

  • Project OrphanAnesthesia is a project whose aim is to create peer-reviewed, readily accessible guidelines for patients with rare diseases and for the anesthesiologists caring for them. The project is a collaborative effort of the German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Orphanet, the European Society of Pediatric Anesthesia, anesthetists and rare disease experts with the aim to contribute to patient safety.

Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • The Centers for Mendelian Genomics program is working to discover the causes of rare genetic disorders. For more information about applying to the research study, please visit their website.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Moyamoya disease. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.
  • Orphanet lists clinical trials, research studies, and patient registries enrolling people with this condition. Click on Orphanet to view the list.
  • The Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool (RePORT) provides access to reports, data, and analyses of research activities at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), including information on NIH expenditures and the results of NIH-supported research. Although these projects may not conduct studies on humans, you may want to contact the investigators to learn more. To search for studies, enter the disease name in the "Text Search" box. Then click "Submit Query".
Other Names for this Disease
  • Moyamoya disease 1
  • Moyamoya disease 2
  • Moyamoya disease 3
  • Moyamoya disease, primary
  • Moyamoya disease, secondary
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.