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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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McCune Albright syndrome

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Other Names for this Disease

  • Albright syndrome
  • Albright's disease
  • MAS
  • PFD
  • POFD
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

I was diagnosed with McCune Albright when I was 16. I was wondering the risks of pregnancy with McCune Albright? I am 20 now and already had 1 miscarriage. I want to know if this is possibly from my syndrome?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

What is known about fertility and pregnancy risks in women with McCune Albright syndrome?

Although a lot is known about McCune Albright syndrome (MAS) in children, issues arising specifically during adulthood are less well understood. Precocious puberty can lead to abnormal gonad (ovary or testes) function and problems with fertility in adults.[1] Women with MAS are susceptible to developing large ovarian cysts and irregular vaginal bleeding. This can interfere with normal ovulation. Some affected women experience anovulation (when an egg is not released from the ovaries).[1] In most cases, adults with MAS have been able to have children, even if it may take longer than normal to conceive.[2] Endometrial function may be also affected due to elevated progesterone levels throughout the cycle, which may make implantation of an embryo difficult. In some cases, removal of the affected ovary (ovariectomy) may improve endocrine function and the function of the remaining ovary, thus improving fertility.[3]

Reports have shown that during pregnancy in women with MAS, the rate of bone turnover (when the body removes old bone that should then be replaced) is increased compared with unaffected pregnant women, suggesting that pregnancy could induce changes of bone metabolism. Some researchers have suggested there may be an increased risk of tumor development during pregnancy (i.e. an increased risk of fibrous dysplasia developing into osteosarcoma). However, further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between pregnancy and tumor development in women with MAS.[4]
Last updated: 1/3/2014

References
  • Chanson P, Salenave S, Young J. Ovarian dysfunction by activating mutation of GS alpha: McCune-Albright syndrome as a model. Ann Endocrinol (Paris). May, 2010; 71(3):210-213. Accessed 1/2/2014.
  • Michael T Collins, Frederick R Singer and Erica Eugster. McCune-Albright syndrome and the extraskeletal manifestations of fibrous dysplasia. Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases. May 24, 2012; 7(Suppl 1):S4. Accessed 1/2/2014.
  • Laven JS, Lumbroso S, Sultan C, Fauser BC. Management of infertility in a patient presenting with ovarian dysfunction and McCune-Albright syndrome. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. March, 2004; 89(3):1076-1078. Accessed 1/2/2014.
  • Kanazawa I, et. al. Osteosarcoma in a pregnant patient with McCune-Albright syndrome. Bone. September, 2009; 45(3):603-608. Accessed 1/3/2014.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Albright syndrome
  • Albright's disease
  • MAS
  • PFD
  • POFD
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.