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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Growth hormone deficiency


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Overview

Growth hormone deficiency is characterized by abnormally short height due to lack (or shortage) of growth hormone. It can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired. Most of the time, no single clear cause can be identified. Most cases are identified in children. Although it is uncommon, growth hormone deficiency may also be diagnosed in adults.[1] Too little growth hormone can cause short stature in children, and changes in muscle mass, cholesterol levels, and bone strength in adults.[2] In adolescents, puberty may be delayed or absent. Treatment involves growth hormone injections. [1]
Last updated: 9/28/2011

References

  1. Kaneshiro NK. Growth hormone deficiency - children. MedlinePlus. 2010; http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001176.htm. Accessed 9/28/2011.
  2. Eckman AS. Growth hormone test. MedlinePlus. 2010; http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003706.htm. Accessed 9/28/2011.
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Basic Information

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General Information

  • Medscape Reference has 2 references articles on this topic from the perspective of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine. You may need to register to view the information online, but registration is free.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference has 2 references articles on this topic from the perspective of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine. You may need to register to view the information online, but registration is free.
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.