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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Glutaric acidemia type I


Other Names for this Disease

  • GA 1
  • Glutaric acidemia 1
  • Glutaric acidemia type 1
  • Glutaric aciduria 1
  • Glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

I know that a large head can be a trait of this. I have also heard that a lot of the kids have a higher IQ. Are there any other traits? Is there anything about strong stomach acid or high acidity?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

What traits are associated with glutaric acidemia type 1?

Infants with glutaric acidemia type 1 may have a large head circumference, but otherwise people with this condition tend to have a typical physical appearance. Glutaric acidemia type 1 is a serious condition in which the body is not able to process protein properly. Glutaric acidemia type 1 can cause learning, motor, and speech problems. Although children with glutaric acidemia type 1 can also have a normal IQ.[1] Early treatment of this condition is vital to avoid serious health complications. For detailed information on the signs and symptoms of glutaric acidemia type 1 and its treatment visit the following link to the STAR-G Web site:
http://www.newbornscreening.info/Parents/organicaciddisorders/GA1.html
Last updated: 3/5/2014

Can glutaric acidemia type 1 cause stomach issues, such as high acidity?

People with glutaric acidemia type 1 are prone to develop pancreatitis.[2] Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. The pancreas is a large gland behind the stomach and close to the first part of the small intestine. It secretes digestive juices into the small intestine through a tube called the pancreatic duct. The pancreas also releases the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis can be acute (sudden severe onset) or chronic. Either form is serious and can lead to complications. Common symptoms are severe pain in the upper abdomen, nausea, and vomiting.[3] For more information on pancreatitis, visit MedlinePlus.gov at the following link:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/pancreatitis.html
Last updated: 3/5/2014

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • GA 1
  • Glutaric acidemia 1
  • Glutaric acidemia type 1
  • Glutaric aciduria 1
  • Glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.