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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Fox-Fordyce disease


Other Names for this Disease
  • Apocrine miliaria
  • Fox-Fordyce syndrome
  • Miliaria, apocrine
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Overview


Fox-Fordyce disease is a chronic skin disease most common in women aged 13-35 years.[1] It is characterized by the development of intense itching in the underarm area, the pubic area, and around the nipple of the breast as a result of  perspiration which becomes trapped in the sweat gland and surrounding areas.[2]  The cause is unknown, but heat, humidity, and stress appear to be exacerbating factors. Retinoids, antibiotics, and immunosuppressants have had limited success in controlling the symptoms.[1] 
Last updated: 4/25/2011

References

  1. White SW, Gorman CR. Fox-Fordyce Disease. eMedicine. January 12, 2007; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1070560-overview. Accessed 3/30/2009.
  2. Fox Fordyce Disease. National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). 2000; http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdbdetail_abstract.html?disname=Fox%20Fordyce%20Disease. Accessed 3/30/2009.
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Basic Information

  • DermNet NZ is an online resource about skin diseases developed by the New Zealand Dermatological Society Incorporated. DermNet NZ provides information about this condition.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. Click on the link to view this information. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Fox-Fordyce disease. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.