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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva


Other Names for this Disease

  • FOP
  • Myositis ossificans
  • Myositis ossificans progressiva
  • Progressive myositis ossificans
  • Progressive ossifying myositis
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Your Question

What are symptoms of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressive?

Our Answer

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What are the symptoms of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva?

Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is characterized by the gradual replacement of muscle tissue and connective tissue (such as tendons and ligaments) by bone, restricting movement. This process generally becomes noticeable in early childhood, starting with the neck and shoulders and proceeding down the body and into the limbs.[1]

The formation of extra-skeletal bone causes progressive loss of mobility as the joints become affected. Speaking and eating may also become difficult as the mouth becomes affected. Over time, people with FOP may become malnourished because of the inability to eat. They may also develop breathing difficulties as a result of extra bone formation around the rib cage that restricts expansion of the lungs.[1]

Any trauma to the muscles of an individual with FOP (a fall or an invasive medical procedure) may trigger episodes of muscle swelling and inflammation followed by more rapid ossification in the injured area. Flare-ups may also be caused by viral illnesses such as the flu.[1]

People with FOP are generally born with malformed big toes. This abnormality of the big toes is a characteristic feature that helps to distinguish this disorder from other bone and muscle problems. Affected individuals may also have short thumbs and other skeletal abnormalities.[1]
Last updated: 4/10/2014

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • FOP
  • Myositis ossificans
  • Myositis ossificans progressiva
  • Progressive myositis ossificans
  • Progressive ossifying myositis
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.