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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita


Other Names for this Disease

  • Acquired epidermolysis bullosa
  • EB acquisita
  • EBA
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Symptoms

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What are the signs and symptoms of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita?

Symptoms of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) usually occur in a person's 30s or 40s. The signs and symptoms can differ among affected people, and the condition has several distinct forms of onset.[1] For example:

Non-inflammatory or mildly inflammatory EBA affecting only trauma-prone skin (the "classic" form) may cause:

  • tense, blood- or pus-filled blisters, mostly on the hands, knees, knuckles, elbows and ankles
  • mucous-membrane blisters that rupture easily
  • healing with significant scarring and small white spots (milia)

Generalized inflammatory EBA may cause:

  • widespread blisters that are not localized to trauma-prone sites
  • generalized redness and itching
  • healing with minimal scarring
The mucous membrane form of EBA may cause:
  • blisters on various mucous membranes
  • significant scarring and dysfunction[1]
The features of the condition may change during the course of the disease or may represent two forms at the same time.[2]
Last updated: 3/3/2014

References
  1. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. DermNet NZ. December 29, 2013; http://www.dermnetnz.org/immune/epidermolysis-bullosa-acquisita.html. Accessed 2/27/2014.
  2. Gupta R, Woodley DT, Chen M. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. Clin Dermatol. January-February, 2012; 30(1):60-69. Accessed 3/3/2014.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Acquired epidermolysis bullosa
  • EB acquisita
  • EBA
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.