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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Dermatomyositis


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Overview


Dermatomyositis is one of a group of acquired muscle diseases called inflammatory myopathies (disorder of muscle tissue or muscles), which are characterized by chronic muscle inflammation accompanied by muscle weakness. The cardinal symptom is a skin rash that precedes or accompanies progressive muscle weakness.[1] Dermatomyositis may occur at any age, but is most common in adults in their late 40s to early 60s, or children between 5 and 15 years of age.[2] There is no cure for dermatomyositis, but the symptoms can be treated. Options include medication, physical therapy, exercise, heat therapy (including microwave and ultrasound), orthotics and assistive devices, and rest.[1] The cause of dermatomyositis is unknown.[3]

Last updated: 8/26/2013

References

  1. NINDS Dermatomyositis Information Page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). August 2011; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/dermatomyositis/dermatomyositis.htm. Accessed 8/26/2013.
  2. Dermatomyositis. MayoClinic.com. July 2011; http://www.mayoclinic.com/print/dermatomyositis/DS00335/DSECTION=all&METHOD=print. Accessed 8/26/2013.
  3. Moskowitz RJ. Dermatomyositis. MedlinePlus. February 2011; http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000839.htm. Accessed 8/26/2013.
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Basic Information

  • MayoClinic.com provides information about dermatomyositis. Click on the link above to access this information.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) collects and disseminates research information related to neurological disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.

In Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. Click on the link to view this information. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.  Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Dermatomyositis. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.

Selected Full-Text Journal Articles