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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma


Other Names for this Disease

  • ChRCC
  • CRCC
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma is a subtype of the most common form of kidney cancer called renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma makes up about 4-6% of RCC, and it is frequently diagnosed between ages 50 and 60.[1] It is thought to have a more favorable prognosis than clear cell RCC, which is the main subtype of RCC.[1]
Last updated: 11/2/2010

References

  1. Tan MH, et al. BMC Cancer. 2010; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2883967. Accessed 11/2/2010.
  2. Stec R, Grala B, Maczewski M, Bodnar L, Szczylik C. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma - review of the literature and potential methods of treating metastatic disease. Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research. 2009; 28:134. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2764641. Accessed 11/2/2010.
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In Depth Information

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Selected Full-Text Journal Articles

Other Names for this Disease
  • ChRCC
  • CRCC
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.