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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Cerebellar degeneration


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Overview

Cerebellar degeneration is a disease process in which neurons in the cerebellum (the area of the brain that controls muscle coordination and balance) deteriorate and die.[1] Cerebellar degeneration does not constitute a specific diagnosis, but rather is used to describe the changes that occur in a person's nervous system.[2] Diseases that cause cerebellar degeneration can also involve areas of the brain that connect the cerebellum to the spinal cord, such as the medulla oblongata, the cerebral cortex, and the brain stem. Cerebellar degeneration has many different causes, but is most often the result of inherited genetic mutations.[1][2]
Last updated: 3/28/2011

References

  1. NINDS Cerebellar Degeneration Information Page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). June 27, 2008; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebellar_degeneration/cerebellar_degeneration.htm. Accessed 10/2/2008.
  2. NINDS Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration Information Page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). June 3, 2008; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/ataxia/ataxia.htm. Accessed 10/2/2008.
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Basic Information

In Depth Information

  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Cerebellar degeneration. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.