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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Blepharospasm


Other Names for this Disease
  • BEB
  • Benign Essential Blepharospasm
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Your Question

Approximately how many people in the United States have benign essential blepharospasm?

Our Answer

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What is benign essential blepharospasm?

Benign essential blepharospasm is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions and spasms of the eyelid muscles. It is a form of dystonia, a movement disorder in which muscle contractions cause sustained eyelid closure, twitching or repetitive movements. Benign essential blepharospasm occurs in both men and women, although it is especially common in middle-aged and elderly women. Most cases are treated with botulinum toxin injections.[1] The exact cause of benign essential blepharospasm is unknown.[2]
Last updated: 7/22/2009

Approximately how many people in the United States have benign essential blepharospasm?

It is estimated that there are at least 50,000 cases of benign essential blepharospasm in the United States, with up to 2000 new cases diagnosed annually.[3][4] The prevalence of benign essential blepharospasm in the general population is approximately 5 in 100,000.[3][5]
Last updated: 7/22/2009

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