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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Adie syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • Adie's Pupil
  • HAS
  • Holmes-Adie syndrome
  • Tonic, sluggishly reacting pupil and hypoactive or absent tendon reflexes
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Symptoms

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What are the symptoms of Adie syndrome?

Adie syndrome is characterized by one eye with a pupil that is larger than normal that constricts slowly in bright light (tonic pupil), along with the absence of deep tendon reflexes, usually in the Achilles tendon. It typically begins gradually in one eye, and often progresses to involve the other eye. At first, it may only cause the loss of deep tendon reflexes on one side of the body, but then progress to the other side. The eye and reflex symptoms may not appear at the same time.  People with Adie syndrome may also sweat excessively, sometimes only on one side of the body. The combination of these 3 symptoms – abnormal pupil size, loss of deep tendon reflexes, and excessive sweating – is usually called Ross’s syndrome, although some doctors will still diagnosis the condition as a variant of Adie syndrome. Some individuals will also have cardiovascular abnormalities. The symptoms of Adie syndrome can appear on their own, or in association with other diseases of the nervous system, such as Sjogren’s syndrome or migraine.[1] 
Last updated: 5/3/2010

References
  1. NINDS Holmes-Adie syndrome Information Page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). February 13, 2007; http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/holmes_adie/holmes_adie.htm. Accessed 5/3/2010.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Adie's Pupil
  • HAS
  • Holmes-Adie syndrome
  • Tonic, sluggishly reacting pupil and hypoactive or absent tendon reflexes
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.