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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Amniotic band syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • Amniotic bands sequence
  • Congenital constricting bands
  • Familial amniotic bands
  • Streeter anomaly
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Tests & Diagnosis

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How is amniotic band syndrome diagnosed?

The earliest reported detection of an amniotic band is at 12 weeks gestation, by vaginal ultrasound.[1] On ultrasound the bands appear as thin, mobile lines, which may be seen attached to or around the baby.[2] However these bands may be difficult to detect by ultrasound, and are more often diagnosed by the results of the fusion, such as missing or deformed limbs.
Last updated: 11/1/2013

References
  1. Amniotic Band Syndrome / ABS: An Overview of Amniotic Band Syndrome. The Fetal Care Center of Cincinatti. 2005; http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/service/f/fetal-care/conditions/abs/default/. Accessed 10/17/2013.
  2. Wehbeh H et al. Obstet Gynecol. 1993; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8459968. Accessed 10/17/2013.


Other Names for this Disease
  • Amniotic bands sequence
  • Congenital constricting bands
  • Familial amniotic bands
  • Streeter anomaly
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.