Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Print friendly version

Oculomotor apraxia Cogan type


Other Names for this Disease

  • Cogan's syndrome type 2
  • COMA
  • Congenital oculomotor apraxia
  • Saccade initiation failure congenital
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Treatment

Newline Maker

How might oculomotor apraxia Cogan type be treated?

Unfortunately, there is no cure for oculomotor apraxia Cogan type and treatment is focused on managing symptoms. Vision therapies may be helpful for some children with this condition. It is recommended that individuals with this disorder see the appropriate specialists necessary to help monitor their specific symptoms. Suggested specialists may include a nephrologist (kidney specialist), ophthalmologist (eye doctor), geneticist, and neurologist, as well as any others recommended by your doctor. Kidney failure usually develops in childhood or early adulthood, and management may require medications, dialysis, and/or kidney transplantation.
Last updated: 3/25/2014

References
  1. Cogan type Congenital Oculomotor Apraxia. Joubert Syundrome and Related Disorders Foundation. http://www.jsrdf.org/PDF/cogansyndrome06-26-061.pdf. Accessed 3/24/2014.


Clinical Trials & Research for this Disease

  • The Centers for Mendelian Genomics program is working to discover the causes of rare genetic disorders. For more information about applying to the research study, please visit their website.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are studying or have studied Oculomotor apraxia Cogan type. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies.
Other Names for this Disease
  • Cogan's syndrome type 2
  • COMA
  • Congenital oculomotor apraxia
  • Saccade initiation failure congenital
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.