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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Congenital hypothyroidism


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Overview

Congenital hypothyroidism is a condition that affects infants from birth and results from a partial or complete loss of thyroid function (hypothyroidism). The thyroid gland makes hormones that play an important role in regulating growth, brain development, and metabolism in the body. Congenital hypothyroidism occurs when the thyroid gland fails to develop or function properly. If untreated, congenital hypothyroidism can lead to intellectual disability and abnormal growth. In the United States and many other countries, all newborns are tested for congenital hypothyroidism. If treatment begins in the first month after birth, infants usually develop normally. Most cases of congenital hypothyroidism occur in people with no history of the disorder in their family; however, this condition can also be inherited.[1]
Last updated: 10/19/2011

References

  1. Congenital hypothyroidism. Genetics Home Reference. May 2006; http://www.ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/congenital-hypothyroidism. Accessed 10/19/2011.
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Basic Information

  • Genetics Home Reference (GHR) contains information on Congenital hypothyroidism. This website is maintained by the National Library of Medicine.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) is a federation of more than 130 nonprofit voluntary health organizations serving people with rare disorders. Click on the link to view information on this topic.
  • The Screening, Technology And Research in Genetics (STAR-G) Project has a fact sheet on this condition, which was written specifically for families that have received a diagnosis as a result of newborn screening. This fact sheet provides general information about the condition and answers questions that are of particular concern to parents.

In Depth Information

  • The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is an catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. 
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs.  Access to this database is free of charge.
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.