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Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Autoimmune gastrointestinal dysmotility


Other Names for this Disease

  • AGID
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview

Autoimmune gastrointestinal dysmotility (AGID) is a rare form of autoimmune autonomic neuropathy that can occur either due to an idiopathic cause or a paraneoplastic cause. Idiopathic forms of AGID are a manifestation of autoimmune autonomic neuropathy that affects the digestive nervous system. The signs and symptoms of AGID may include achalasia,gastroparesishypertrophic pyloric stenosisintestinal pseudo-obstructionmegacolon and anal spasm. Treatment options for AGID includes symptom relief, treatment of any underlying neoplasm if necessary, immunotherapy and supportive treatment. Nutrition and hydration therapy as well as management of abdominal pain are important supportive treatment measures.[1]
Last updated: 4/17/2014

References

  1. Pasha SF, Lunsford TN, Lennon VA. Autoimmune gastrointestinal dysmotility treated successfully with pyridostigmine. Gastroenterology. 2006; 131(5):1592-6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17101331. Accessed 4/17/2014.
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In Depth Information

  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Autoimmune gastrointestinal dysmotility. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.
Other Names for this Disease
  • AGID
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.