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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Aquagenic urticaria


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Overview

Aquagenic urticaria is characterized by itchy white or red lumps that occur after direct contact with water, regardless of its temperature. It more commonly affects women and symptoms often start around the onset of puberty. It can occur alone or in association with other forms of urticaria. It can affect the whole or portions of the body. The cause of aquagenic urticaria is currently unknown.[1][2][3][4]
Last updated: 12/19/2011

References

  1. ST Yavuz, UM Sahiner, A Tuncer, C Sackesen. . Aquagenic urticaria in two adolescents. J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol . 2010; Vol. 20(7): 620-632; http://www.jiaci.org/issues/vol20issue7/vol20issue07-17.htm. Accessed 12/19/2011.
  2. Baptist AP, Baldwin JL. Aquagenic urticaria with extracutaneous manifestations. Allergy Asthma Proc. 2005 May-Jun;26(3):217-20; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16119038. Accessed 12/19/2011.
  3. Bayle P, Gadroy A, Messer L, Bazex J. Localized aquagenic urticaria: efficacy of a barrier cream. Contact Dermatitis. 2003 Sep;49(3):160-1; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14678215. Accessed 12/19/2011.
  4. Luong KV, Nguyen LT. Aquagenic urticaria: report of a case and review of the literature. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 1998 Jun;80(6):483-5; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9647271. Accessed 12/19/2011.
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  • The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is an catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Each entry has a summary of related medical articles. It is meant for health care professionals and researchers. OMIM is maintained by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.¬†
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See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.