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Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

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Barraquer-Simons syndrome


Other Names for this Disease

  • APL
  • Lipodystophy partial progressive
  • Lipodystrophy cephalothoracic type
  • Lipodystrophy partial acquired
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Your Question

I want to know if this syndrome is dangerous for my life, is there any possibility that I will die young? Can you help me? I want to know more about my disease. Can I cure it?

Our Answer

We have identified the following information that we hope you find helpful. If you still have questions, please contact us.

How might Barraquer-Simons syndrome be treated?

Surgery may be used to improve a person's appearance, but is not needed for medical reasons. Facial reconstruction techniques may be used with varying success. These techniques may include transplantation of fat tissue, silicone implants, movement of facial muscles, or other techniques.

No specific diet is recommended for people with Barraquer-Simons syndrome and weight gain should be avoided. Regular exercise is recommended to improve a person's metabolic status.

If a person with Barraquer-Simons syndrome has kidney problems, then they may also need to be managed. Treatment may involving a special diet or medications. Dialysis or a kidney transplant may be needed if the condition progresses to kidney failure.[1]
Last updated: 12/13/2013

What is the long term outcome for Barraquer-Simons syndrome?

Barraquer-Simons syndrome is a disease that progresses slowly. It causes a loss of fat tissue in the face, which can affect facial features. About 20 percent of people develop a type of kidney disease called membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, which can cause serious complications. Rarely, Barraquer-Simons syndrome can cause insulin resistance.[1]
Last updated: 12/13/2013

References
Other Names for this Disease
  • APL
  • Lipodystophy partial progressive
  • Lipodystrophy cephalothoracic type
  • Lipodystrophy partial acquired
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.