Your browser does not support javascript:   Search for gard hereSearch for news-and-events here.

Diseases

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

Print friendly version

Windblown hand


Other Names for this Disease
  • Congenital contractures of the digits
  • Congenital ulnar drift
  • Windswept hand
See Disclaimer regarding information on this site. Some links on this page may take you to organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health.

Overview


Windblown hand is a hand deformity that is present from birth. The cause of this deformit is unkown. People with windblown hand have flexion contractures of the joints at the base of each finger that prevents normal mobility of their hand and causes their fingers to bend toward their "little" finger (i.e., ulnar drift). In addition, windblown hand is characterized by a "thumb-in-palm deformity" or "clasped thumb" where the thumb is webbed to the palm by a soft tissue bridge.[1]

Click here to view the anatomy of the hand provided by the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.
Last updated: 7/23/2013

References

  1. Wood VE, Biondi J. Treatment of the windblown hand. J Hand Surg [Am]. 1990;
  2. Grunert J, Jakubietz M, Polykandriotis E, Langer M. The windblown hand - Diagnosis, clinical picture and pathogenesis. Handchir Mikrochir Plast Chir. 2004;
Your Questions Answered
by the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

1 question(s) from the public on Windblown hand have been answered. See questions and answers. You can also submit a new question.

Basic Information

  • The American Society for Surgery of the Hand provides information on congenital differences of the hand. Click on American Society for Surgery of the Hand to view the information page.
  • The Children’s Hospital Boston has a information page on congenital limb defects. Click on the link above to view this information page.
  • More information on limb abnormalities can be found at the following link from MEDLINEplus, the National Library of Medicine Web site designed to help you research your health questions.
  • More information on hand disorders can be found by visiting MedlinePlus, the National Library of Medicine Web site designed to help you research your health questions. Click on MedlinePlus to view this information.

In Depth Information

  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Windblown hand. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.